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High school students build wheelchair-stroller for new dad who lost mobility due to a brain tumor

High school students build wheelchair-stroller for new dad who lost mobility due to a brain tumor.
High school students build wheelchair-stroller for new dad who lost mobility due to a brain tumor. Courtesy of Chelsie King.

A group of high school students are being praised for helping a new dad, who has mobility issues, safely carry his newborn son.

When Jeremy King of Germantown, Maryland, lost his ability to balance properly due to a brain tumor, he had given up all hope of being able to safely carry his newborn son. However, 10 high school students, all sharing an innovative spirit, gave King the gift of being able to care for his son.

Jeremy King assembling the wheelchair-stroller
Jeremy King assembling the wheelchair-stroller. Courtesy of Chelsie King.

It all started in Matt Zigler’s classroom, a high school teacher who has a class called “Making for Social Good,” in which students design products that will have a positive social impact.

Zigler had been approached by Chelsie King, Jeremy’s wife, who also works at the same school as a drama teacher. Chelsie asked Zigler if he could help her “come up with something that might attach to Jeremy’s wheelchair,” to give him the freedom to be mobile with their child.

High school students build wheelchair-stroller for new dad who lost mobility due to a brain tumor.
High school students build wheelchair-stroller for new dad who lost mobility due to a brain tumor. Courtesy of Matt Zigler.

Challenge Accepted

Ziglar and his innovative students accepted the challenge and got to work. The students were split into two groups; one that would work on a car seat attachment for Jeremy’s wheelchair, and the other on the “WheeStroll” Stroller Connector, which would allow for a stroller to be attached to the chair.

“Children grow and they grow out of a car seat, so we wanted Mr. King to be able to walk with his son no matter what age he is,” Jacob Zlotnisky, a student in the class told Good Morning America.

Jeremy and Chelsie King trying out the wheelchair-stroller with their new son Phoenix
Jeremy and Chelsie King trying out the wheelchair-stroller with their new son Phoenix. Courtesy of Chelsie King.

Some of the parts were purchased from Home Depot while others were made using the school’s 3D printer. The students finished their project right on time as King’s son, Phoenix, was born a few weeks later. And Jeremy King couldn’t have been more excited to try it out.

“Using it was overwhelming because I never thought I would be able to do something like this with our son,” Jeremy King said.

Jeremy King trying out the wheelchair-stroller with his new son Phoenix.
Jeremy King trying out the wheelchair-stroller with his new son Phoenix. Courtesy of Chelsie King.

As for the students, they also got a mood boost from the life-changing project.

“I feel fortunate to have been able to take a class that has allowed me to truly make a difference in someone’s life,” Zlotnitsky said.


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